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FAQ

Content:

For electrical contractors and electricians

  1. I hold the general authorisation AB – am I allowed to carry out electrical installations at home after 1 July 2017?

    Yes. Provided it is not for business purposes, you are allowed to carry out electrical installation work at home if it is covered by your authorisation.

  2. I am an electrical contractor and currently supervise five electricians. Will I become the Compliance Officer after 1 July 2017?

    It is up to the electrical installation company to appoint Compliance Officers. Contact your employer to find out what will happen in your organisation after 1 July 2017.

  3. I already have the old-style authorisation – do I need to apply for the new-style authorisation by 1 July 2017.

    No. Your authorisation will be converted to a new-style authorisation automatically. There is no need to contact the Swedish National Electrical Safety Board.

  4. What will happen to my limited authorisation BB3?

    It will be converted to a new-style authorisation with the same content as your existing authorisation. If your old BB3 has the same content as a new-style A, AL or BL authorisation, it will be converted to one of those instead. You can find out more in the conversion table on pages 30-31 of the document explaining the new rules (Nya regler för elarbete, in Swedish).

  5. We are electrical contractors without AB, ABL, BB1 or BB2 – for which activity types can we act as Compliance Officers?

    Without an A, AL or B authorisation no one can act as a Compliance Officer for any activity types.

    This is because there are no activity types for which authorisations other than A, AL or B are sufficient.
  6. I’ve been working for many years and after retraining I now want to apply for an ABL authorisation. What should I do?

    If you apply for and receive an ABL general authorisation before 1 July 2017, it will automatically become a new-style ABL general authorisation on 1 July 2017.

    It does not make any difference whether you apply before or after 1 July 2017.

For electrical installation companies

  1. When do I have to register my company? 

    You must register your company before you start work on a system which is not your own.

    If you quote for electrical installation work before you are registered, you should let your customer know that you will be registered by the time the work is done. Remember that the self-audit scheme will also need to be updated to include the new activity, so make sure you set aside enough time for this.

    If you are already carrying out electrical installation work, you must have registered by 1 July 2017, in other words before the new rules come into force.

    The Swedish National Electrical Safety Board will allow companies to register from January 2017.

  2. Do I have to register all the company’s places of business? 

    You must complete a registration for each company (one official company registration number = one company = one registration).

    If your places of business operate with different routines your self-audit scheme must reflect that, but all places of business in the same company are covered by the same registration. This means you register your company for all activity types even if certain activities are only carried out in one or more places of business.

  3. How do I register? 

    If you have an official Swedish company registration number it is best to ask one of your Compliance Officers to register for you. It is easiest to use the Swedish National Electrical Safety Board’s e-service for direct registration (requires an e-ID).

    If you do this, your company will be added directly to the register without any delay.

  4. What if I want to do work in activity types I am not registered for? 

    You must not start work until you are properly registered in the Swedish National Electrical Safety Board’s register of companies.

  5. Do I need to send my self-audit scheme to the Swedish National Electrical Safety Board? 

    No. However, the self-audit scheme does come under the supervision of the Swedish National Electrical Safety Board so you may need to show the routines, etc. in your self-audit scheme if asked. The self-audit scheme is primarily intended as a tool to help you verify internally that the relevant requirements are being met.

  6. I don’t even know what a self-audit scheme is – how can I be ready by 1 July 2017? 

    A self-audit scheme contains the routines, etc. you need to develop to ensure that electrical installation work is done by people with the right skills and using the right methods, and that the work is monitored effectively. The self-audit scheme is your way of checking that you are meeting the requirements.

    In late 2016, the Swedish National Electrical Safety Board will publish information and guidance for electrical installation companies to help them develop their self-audit scheme.

  7. I only do electrical installation work in another company in the same group – do I need to register my company with the Swedish National Electrical Safety Board? 

    No. If your company and the company you are working in have the same ownership, you do not need to register your company. In this situation you are considered to be working on your own system.

  8. I want to start an electrical installation company – what do I need to think about? 

    You must formulate a self-audit scheme for the activity you plan to carry out. In order to do this you must appoint an electrical contractor with the authorisation necessary for the activity, to provide guidance to the company.

    To carry out electrical installation work on a system which is not your own you must add the company to the Swedish National Electrical Safety Board’s register of companies before you start.

For companies buying electrical installation services

  1. Do I need a written contract with the electrical installation company before going ahead?

    Strictly speaking no, but it is extremely importantly to clearly define certain fundamental elements of the work. We always recommend written contracts for any kind of building work to make sure the job is specified as unambiguously as possible. You may also need to show in future that the work was done by an electrical installation company, for example when you sell the property, and it helps if you can produce the contract and other documentation.

    The electrical installation company you engage is likely to insist on a written contract to clarify exactly what work needs to be done and the conditions it expects to find. The web site omboende.se (external link, in Swedish) has plenty of guidance on formulating contracts between you and your tradesmen.

  2. What should I do if the building firm I plan to engage is not on the Swedish National Electrical Safety Board register of companies when I check afer 1 July 2017?

    Check with the building firm if they will be carrying out the electrical installations themselves or if they will use a subcontractor. If they are not carrying out the electrical installations themselves, it is their subcontractor that you need to check in the Swedish National Electrical Safety Board’s register of companies.

    The e-service called Kolla elföretaget, which allows you to check electrical companies, will be launched on 1 July 2017.

  3. I engaged a company do the electrics at home, but they made a lot of mistakes. I’ve asked another company to put things right, but what should I do about the first company?

    You should report an electrical installation company to the Swedish National Electrical Safety Board if it conducts itself in an unacceptable way or if there is reason to believe that it does not meet the requirements of the Electrical Safety Act or adhere to the rules applicable to electrical installation companies.

    Starting 1 July 2017, the Swedish National Electrical Safety Board will have the duty to supervise electrical installation companies. It will be able to instruct companies to take action. If they then fail to take action, the Swedish National Electrical Safety Board has the power to stop them operating.

For individuals

  1. When can I start looking for electrical installation companies in the Swedish National Electrical Safety Board’s register of companies?

    You will be able to search the register from 1 July 2017, which is when the new Electrical Safety Act comes into force.

  2. Why is the reform happening?

    The standard of electrical safety in Sweden is mostly high.

    Even so, the rules are complex and difficult to understand, with no clear division of responsibilities between companies, electrical contractors and electricians.

    We also want to:

    • make it easier for individuals like you to improve the quality of the work done on your system,
    • make it easier for the Swedish National Electrical Safety Board to perform its supervisory duties.
  3. What work is covered by the new requirements?

    All electrical installation work is covered by the new requirements with a small number of exceptions. Simplifying slightly, electrical installation work is defined as

    • all work on an electrical system up to and including the power outlet, and
    • any permanent connection and disconnection of electrical equipment such as cookers and washing machines.

    The Swedish National Electrical Safety Board has proposed a small number of exemptions, for example in certain situations you do not need to engage an electrical installation company to replace an existing power outlet.

  4. What is meant by the general duty of care?

    All electrical installation work must be carried out in a way which ensures that the system is safe.

    That means no one should ever carry out electrical installation work unless they know what they are doing!

    The work must also be done in accordance with ELSÄK-FS 2008:1-2.

  5. What is meant by unauthorised electrical installation work?

    Unauthorised electrical installation work is any work that breaches section 27 of the Electrical Safety Act. Even if the work is done correctly, this is a criminal offence punishable by fines or up to a year in prison.

  6. What is the difference between an electrical installation company and the work I do privately on my own system.

    The moment you carry out electrical installation work for business purposes you become an electrical installation company, and you must meet the self-audit and registration requirements and appoint at least one Compliance Officer, etc.

    If there is any kind of remuneration the work is considered to be for business purposes, although work sometimes falls into this category even if no payment is involved. For example major projects are classed as being for business purposes.

  7. Do I need a written contract with the electrical installation company before going ahead?

    Strictly speaking no, but it is extremely importantly to clearly define certain fundamental elements of the work. We always recommend written contracts for any kind of building work to make sure the job is specified as unambiguously as possible. You may also need to show in future that the work was done by an electrical installation company, for example when you sell the property, and it helps if you can produce the contract and other documentation.

    The electrical installation company you engage is likely to insist on a written contract to clarify exactly what work needs to be done and the conditions it expects to find. The web site omboende.se (external link, in Swedish) has plenty of guidance on formulating contracts between you and your tradesmen.

  8. What should I do if the building firm I plan to engage is not on the Swedish National Electrical Safety Board register of companies when I check?

    Check with the building firm if they will be carrying out the electrical installations themselves or if they will use a subcontractor. If they are not carrying out the electrical installations themselves, it is their subcontractor that you need to check in the Swedish National Electrical Safety Board’s register of companies.

  9. I engaged a company do the electrics at home, but they made a lot of mistakes. I’ve asked another company to put things right, but what should I do about the first company?

    You should report an electrical installation company to the Swedish National Electrical Safety Board if it conducts itself in an unacceptable way or if there is reason to believe that it does not meet the requirements of the Electrical Safety Act or adhere to the rules applicable to electrical installation companies.

    Starting 1 July 2017, the Swedish National Electrical Safety Board will have the duty to supervise electrical installation companies. It will be able to instruct companies to take action. If they then fail to take action, the Swedish National Electrical Safety Board has the power to stop them operating.

Responsible: Camilla Arnäs-Nielsen
Published: 2016-12-07
Updated: 2016-12-07